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Accepting trash and recyclables in las Vegas

Now Las Vegas authorities are trying to force the local contractors to dump at a recycling landfill that charges nearly double to dump there, instead of taking it to cheaper dumps.

I can foresee the situation where we will then start seeing construction debris at the roadsides soon, to pay for the non-cost effective state-mandated center.

The price on recyclables varies by area/market demand. The price here is down right now. Have read that some recylers are “walking out” on their contracts to buy them from local collecting authorities because their warehouses are full. Even the state road crews just dump their old culverts, etc. over a bank somewhere.

A few months back, some city friends of ours got a call from the sheriff in an adjacent rural county. Several bags of their garbage had been found, along with bags of their neighbor’s garbage.

Apparently, the midnight garbage men cruise the nice suburbs and pick up trash bags, look through them for credit card offers/numbers and other financial information and then dump the leavings on country roads.

It is not always the owners of the trash that dump it. We recently moved to the country from the city. We stopped at one of our neighbors’ home and asked him where we could take our trash. He responded that he didn’t know where the dump was because he just takes his trash up into a valley and dumps it. Since he’s only got an acre of land, the valley has to be on someone else’s land.
 
We found out our township has a convenient service of accepting trash and recyclables twice a month just a couple miles from us so that we don’t have to go to the dump. The only cost is .50 for large plastic bags to use (but you’re not required to use theirs). Alternatively we can use a Las Vegas dumpster rental service for collecting large quantities of junk.

Apparently, it’s not convenient enough. I also see dumps along some rural roads made up of old farm equipment, trailer homes, etc that are rusted beyond use. So city folks aren’t always the culprits. I’m also curious about why some would have to pay to deposit their recyclables. Recyclables are sold as a commodity so it would seem that the dumper of recyclables should not have to pay to dump them.
 
We see a bunch of outdated farm equipment not worth enough to use valuable inside storage but not completely useless. Might modify/combine/separate parts to make a tool for a completely different purpose during off season when time’s not so rare. 

Along some rural roads made up of old farm equipment, case in point trailer homes, etc that are rusted beyond use. mobile storage units. Farmers been using’ it since 1st trailer park family deserted it. Farmers got the idea from using rusted beyond use bus bodies back before “trailer homes” were invented. So city folks aren’t always the culprits. Good Point! I’ve noticed that too.
 
When recycling began in Nevada, aluminum cans in my parts, it was a little extra money on the side and helping the environment. Now I’m noticing the trend toward recycling getting expensive for the consumer.

Special plastic bags, accepting only certain types of plastic or paper, paying the trash disposal companies extra. Don’t get me wrong, as a consumer I feel it is my responsibility to recycle whenever possible and I do but the question is, not so long ago, I could put an extra jingle in my pocket and companies made a profit from the aluminum as well.

Where’s the money going when I have to pay someone to take my aluminum cans? Is this the good ole USA middleman makes all the money schemes?

There surely are lots of bad things that can be said about ‘city-folk’, but I’ve found them (at least those who move to the sticks) to be much more conscious of respecting their (and others’) property than many of the ‘locals’.

We encountered quite a few ‘been here all my life’ types tossing their empty beer cans etc. on my neighbor’s property. So I don’t think all evils can automatically be chalked up to urban refugees.

That said, it is difficult to dispose of trash in the sticks. Once you know where the landfill/dump/transfer station is you have to be able to get there during the very limited operating hours. In some cases you have to go to different places for different types of disposals.
 
Part of the reason I think is inconvenience is cheaper than convenience. Most of the people in my neck of the woods are self employed and can take an hour on a Wednesday to do this stuff instead of waiting in a big line on Saturday.

The more inflexible your hours are, the harder things like get- ting rid of trash will be. Doesn’t excuse tossing it for everyone else to deal with, though.

Around here in the las Vegas suburbs, the price of dumping at the landfill is getting pretty high, mostly because of additional cost for dumping things like water heaters, refrigerators, mattresses, tires, etc. ‘Guess what we see dumped beside the road here?
 
I’m not advocating the practice but our over-regulating the landfills are adding costs and that motivates some people to dump on “other places”. For example, my last well tank and water heater that I dumped cost me $35.00 to take to the dump. That’s a bit high IMHO. Now, they’re trying to force the local contractors to dump at a recycling landfill that charges nearly double to dump there, instead of taking it to cheaper dumps.
 
We can foresee the situation where we will then start seeing construction debris at the roadsides soon, to pay for the non-cost effective state-mandated center.